Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/
Reblogged from thefrogman  13,187 notes

catsbeaversandducks:

Meet Bertie, the owl who is afraid of going outside… and he loves nothing more than helping his owner make a cup of tea!

Bertie, the three-year-old tawny owl that is agoraphobic. He shares a farmhouse with his owner Peter Middleton, and after his daily bath he likes to dry his feathers by sitting on top of the aga. When he isn’t welcoming guests with a hoot or preening them on the sofa, he’s hard at work letter shredding in the office. Mr Middleton said the domesticated owl, which he adopted after he was left abandoned on the ground, hates the outdoors. He said: “He just doesn’t like going outside, I think he’s agoraphobic. He’s not used it and he’s very comfortable in the house.”

Via Daily Mail

Reblogged from jtotheizzoe  4,276 notes

jtotheizzoe:

via skunkbear:

That’s what I call a weather map!

Remember that animated wind map of the United States from a while back? Well, now there’s one of the whole earth! You’ve got to check out the interactive site (which is updated with near current weather) because these images don’t do it justice. YOU CAN ORBIT THE EARTH! YOU CAN ZOOM! YOU CAN SEE WIND SUPERIMPOSED ON TEMPERATURE, PRESSURE AND CLOUDS. Standing ovation to developer Cameron Beccario! (and thanks to my friend Alice Anderson for giving me the heads up)

Mr. Beccario, the slow clap/standing ovation you hear in the distance, coming from in front of computer screens everywhere, is for you.

Did you miss his ocean currents map yesterday? Check it out here.

Reblogged from jtotheizzoe  602 notes
jtotheizzoe:

Our projections are full of projections.
Maps can really mess with your head. Lliterally. The above image comes to us by way of Scientific American, circa 1921. Distorted map projections are not only the result of spheres failing to translate effectively into rectangles (those pesky dimensions!), but often the failure of the culture of the mapper to appreciate the culture of the mappee. Looking at you, here, Mercator (Really?! Africa is 14X the size of Greenland, you Flemish fool!).
If you’d like to chart a course toward better understanding of the many ways we map this world of ours, check out Wired’s MapLab blog, and of course you really must watch this Vlogbrothers video:

And according to xkcd, here’s what your favorite map projection says about you:

(Thanks to Aatish Bhatia for guiding me to this)

jtotheizzoe:

Our projections are full of projections.

Maps can really mess with your head. Lliterally. The above image comes to us by way of Scientific American, circa 1921. Distorted map projections are not only the result of spheres failing to translate effectively into rectangles (those pesky dimensions!), but often the failure of the culture of the mapper to appreciate the culture of the mappee. Looking at you, here, Mercator (Really?! Africa is 14X the size of Greenland, you Flemish fool!).

If you’d like to chart a course toward better understanding of the many ways we map this world of ours, check out Wired’s MapLab blog, and of course you really must watch this Vlogbrothers video:

And according to xkcd, here’s what your favorite map projection says about you:

(Thanks to Aatish Bhatia for guiding me to this)

Reblogged from jtotheizzoe  1,924 notes
jtotheizzoe:

This Is Where You Feel Your Feels
Are our emotions universal, across borders of culture and language? Is my happy the same as your happy? Do I experience anger in precisely the same way that you do?
Psychologically speaking, that’s a difficult question to answer. But according to a new study on the physiological experience of emotions, our bodies respond in very particular ways to a range of feelings.
Hundreds of people were presented with various images designed to cause an emotional response. The participants then indicated where on their bodies they felt increased (orange and yellow, above) or decreased (blue, above) sensation, essentially drawing a kind of atlas of emotional response.
The results are pretty interesting, and nice to look at as well. I have to wonder why contempt causes that very specific lack of sensation south of the border, though.
More at Discover Magazine.

jtotheizzoe:

This Is Where You Feel Your Feels

Are our emotions universal, across borders of culture and language? Is my happy the same as your happy? Do I experience anger in precisely the same way that you do?

Psychologically speaking, that’s a difficult question to answer. But according to a new study on the physiological experience of emotions, our bodies respond in very particular ways to a range of feelings.

Hundreds of people were presented with various images designed to cause an emotional response. The participants then indicated where on their bodies they felt increased (orange and yellow, above) or decreased (blue, above) sensation, essentially drawing a kind of atlas of emotional response.

The results are pretty interesting, and nice to look at as well. I have to wonder why contempt causes that very specific lack of sensation south of the border, though.

More at Discover Magazine.